Do you know the tax deductions for which you might be eligible for with your rented property?

1

Rental property deductions

Owners of rental properties that are rented or are ready and available for rent can claim immediate deductions for a range of expenses, such as:

  • interest on investment loans
  • land tax
  • council and water rates
  • body corporate charges
  • insurance
  • repairs and maintenance
  • agents’ commission
  • gardening
  • pest control
  • leases (preparation, registration and stamp duty)
  • advertising for tenants

 

Landlords may also be entitled to annual deductions for the declining value of depreciable assets (such as stoves, carpets and hot water systems), and capital works deductions spread over a number of years for structural improvements like remodelling a bathroom.

It’s worth noting that the government has proposed that it will change the law to no longer allow travel deductions relating to inspecting, maintaining, or collecting rent for a rental property from 1 July 2017. This is an integrity measure to address concerns that such deductions are being abused.

Further, the government announced that from 1 July 2017 plant and equipment depreciation deductions will be limited to outlays actually incurred by investors in residential real estate properties.

Plant and equipment forming part of residential investment properties as of 9 May 2017 will continue to give rise to deductions for depreciation until either the investor no longer owns the asset, or the asset reaches the end of its effective life.

You can contact AIIM to clarify if expenditure relates to repairs and maintenance that can be claimed immediately, or improvements which need be claimed over time.

2

Residential property and non-residents

The government announced that from 9 May 2017, Australia’s foreign resident capital gains tax regime will be extended to deny foreign and temporary tax residents access to the main residence exemption. Properties held prior to this date will be grandfathered until 30 June 2019.

Share